The Big Black Hope in Bama

Issues, Politics 0 19
Artur Davis

Artur Davis

The KKK, the bombings, the firehoses, the police dogs chewing on protesters as they marched, these are all thoughts that may come into your head when you think of my great state of Alabama. It is my home and known as the birthplace of the Civil Rights Movement. It’s where Rosa Parks sat on the bus with tired feet. It’s where Governor George Wallace stood at the doors of the University of Alabama denying black students from entering. Alabama is history.

Arthur Davis, the Harvard graduate and 3-term U.S. Rep. will be announcing his run for the highest office in the state on today. The audacity of an African-American to seriously run for the governorship of a U.S. state is already a major feet within itself, but to seriously run in a state that in 2000 voted to remove its interracial marriage ban from its constitution, it’s an awesome time in our history.

I can remember having a job which I had to drive around the state of Alabama, sometimes at night in a small Suzuki Vitara (it was a company car, my left toe could hardly fit). I met hundreds of people, maybe even thousands the years that I worked for the company. As we drove around the mountains, valleys, hills and lakes I never witnessed discrimination from anyone. I can even remember walking in businesses with Confederate flags hanging and the scruffy looking businessmen would shake my hand and not ignore me as I was with my white counterpart.

I was always surprised by the differences from old Alabama to the new Alabama. There are still situations of discrimination in my state but the overt racism is slowly dying as the men and women of the Civil Rights era pass away. I have always believed that the racist mind is something that is learned from elders and passed down to their children but the misunderstanding of a people may come from the miseducation of culture and history.

We can not expect someone that’s White who has not been around “the hood” and has been born into the dominant culture of privilege to understand what “Jerome” goes through when he is up for a job with the same education and the same experience but gets paid less or looked over for promotion. It’s all about education. We must teach our children early, black and white history. Correct history.

Davis has a huge job ahead of him. Alabama has changed, but will it accept a black man as its leader? We applaud him for his bravery.

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